Day 91: hamburger

Today’s menu: hamburger, whole wheat buns, carrots, fruit jello, milk

The burger was forgettable. And I mean that in every sense: I don’t remember what it tasted like. Not one bite. Yeah for carrots instead of tater tots (what I usually see with the burger). And the jello was good in a “red number 40” kinda way.

***

For the first time ever I approached another blogger/foodie/writer/chef that I admire about writing a post for his blog (instead being asked I did the asking). So I screwed up some courage and emailed Mark Bittman. He emailed me back saying he was interested in a piece. I almost fainted. My essay appeared on Mark Bittman’s blog today: “The School Lunch Project

The reason I approached him aside from having immense respect for him was that he tweeted about my project early on and so I figured he would be amenable. First I wrote something about what I learned over the course of the project. He emailed me back saying that he wanted something with more personalization so I rewrote it completely. It’s sort-of a sad story, but this blog is not exactly uplifting (although I try to keep it upbeat so you guys aren’t too depressed). I hope you enjoy what I wrote (and I appreciate feedback too).

***

I’d just like to say that at school everyone is ready for summer! The kids AND adults. Just a bit more to go!

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22 Responses to Day 91: hamburger

  1. Prince Andrew and the Queen Mum June 3, 2010 at 1:21 am #

    I just told my husband about your blog.. that you were blogging every day the school lunches and eating them…He said.."is she dead?" too bad that isn't funny…

  2. Anonymous June 3, 2010 at 1:53 am #

    As a lunch duty aide, I have to comment on something you said in your post on Mark Bittman's blog. The kids think 20 minutes to eat is not long enough? That's because they spend the whole time talking.

    20 minutes is about 15 minutes too much. They spend most of the time talking and probably only 5 minutes eating.

    If they just ate they'd have plenty of time.

  3. Nena June 3, 2010 at 1:58 am #

    It's great that they're serving carrots instead of tater tots, but it seems to be either broccoli or carrots…how about a little bit more variety in the vegetables?

  4. Anonymous June 3, 2010 at 2:02 am #

    I found out today that the hamburgers my high school served when I was there were made mostly out of cherries. It still grosses me out to think about it. Luckily I was fortunate enough to pack my lunch most days. The other days I waited until I got home to eat.
    Keep up the good work!! Enjoy your summer! 🙂

  5. Janey June 3, 2010 at 2:04 am #

    Hey Mrs. Q! I found these interesting articles and thought that you should check it out. It's about different school meals from around the world.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2005/mar/30/schoolmeals.schools1

    http://izismile.com/2009/06/02/school_meals_from_around_the_world_30_pics.html

    You should do an article based on these different lunches that are served around the world.
    It's sad, isn't it? Compared to lunches in the USA, Japans' lunches look like they're gourmet. No wonder they do better than us.

  6. Anonymous June 3, 2010 at 2:21 am #

    Eww!! That looks gross.

  7. Momof3 June 3, 2010 at 2:23 am #

    That burger just doesn't look right at all. At least there are carrots.

  8. Kara Hadley June 3, 2010 at 2:42 am #

    Mark Bittman is an absolute favorite of mine. Congrats.

  9. heather t June 3, 2010 at 2:55 am #

    @Anonymous1 – Keep in mind that the kids at Mrs. Q's school do not get recess (a travesty in itself), so it's understandable that they spend most of the 20 minutes talking!

    Nice piece on Mark Bittman's blog, Mrs. Q! Keep up the good work!

  10. Rosa June 3, 2010 at 3:01 am #

    The burger is the one thing I remember fondly from my elementary school lunch days!

    It's ridiculous how little time children are given to eat lunch. Imagine if you took a job and they gave you a twenty minute lunch break! Twenty minutes is insulting–and that doesn't even begin to address the lack of a recess for children at your school.

    Anyway, glad to see that Bittman is sympathetic to the cause. His input could widen your audience considerably. Congrats!

  11. Canton June 3, 2010 at 3:25 am #

    Anonymous #1: According to the essay, that twenty minutes includes standing in line and cleaning up, both of which cut into actual eating time. Even if they did get the full twenty, though, school lunch is (or should be) an important social time. Without recess, for all I know it may be the only real designated social time these kids get at school. Yes, they need proper nutrition, but kids also need to talk to each other. And if that slows down their eating, well, so much the healthier!

  12. dirtyduck June 3, 2010 at 5:11 am #

    congrats on posting on his blog, how exciting!

  13. RainbowW June 3, 2010 at 6:14 am #

    to our anonymous lunch duty aide commenter on this post:

    lunch isn't just about eating. it's also about brain recharge, relaxation, and socialization. if you believe lunch is only about eating, you've obviously learned nothing about critical topics like … how children learn.

  14. a penny June 3, 2010 at 7:32 am #

    not that it matters what I think, but…. I think it is wonderful what you are doing! There are so many children, not just in the states but all over the world, that are overweight or obese. It starts at home but that does not always happen. It is up to the school to help children learn. This does not only mean academic but also health. We have to teach these children to make good choices in all aspects of their life.
    Keep up the good work!

  15. Woolridge Green Club June 3, 2010 at 11:23 am #

    Just like you mention that "after a while, the fruit cup doesn't taste all that bad", wouldn't it stand to reason that the kids would come around to eating healthy food?

    Student: "You know, Mrs. Q. I didn't like this at first, but now I kind of like it."

  16. Woolridge Green Club June 3, 2010 at 11:25 am #

    Here's a question for everyone. Do you think that students would actually spend more time eating or talking more if their lunch period was extended? I don't know what the solution is to get kids to eat their lunch. Socializing is important too, but I wonder if kids would just chat more if their lunch period were longer.

  17. SZA June 3, 2010 at 2:11 pm #

    This looks like orphan food!!!!!!! Isn't this the kind of thing they serve in American prisons? UGH!

  18. Catha ;o) June 3, 2010 at 6:40 pm #

    Well said Canton. Lot's of great comments here about the importance of socialization during lunch, re-booting for better learning and the lack of recess making it all the more important.

    I'm curious if there are lunchroom monitors to help gently remind the students that they can socialize and eat at the same time? How many times have you gone to lunch with friends and found that time got away from you?

  19. Catha ;o) June 3, 2010 at 6:40 pm #

    Well said Canton. Lot's of great comments here about the importance of socialization during lunch, re-booting for better learning and the lack of recess making it all the more important.

    I'm curious if there are lunchroom monitors to help gently remind the students that they can socialize and eat at the same time? How many times have you gone to lunch with friends and found that time got away from you?

  20. Woolridge Green Club June 3, 2010 at 7:51 pm #

    Prison food is probably actually better. I worked on a project at one prison where all of the meat is turkey-based. They do it for health reason as well as to accommodate inmates' religious beliefs.

  21. JGold June 11, 2010 at 8:23 pm #

    Hey, you're telling it like you see it. The light you shine on your school's food doesn't have to be rose-tinted.

    I love how Dora Rivas offered no real commentary or information, while mightily defending the establishment, when there was no need to do so. Shut up, Dora.

  22. Naataaallliiiiiiiiieeee June 13, 2010 at 3:18 am #

    lookss,drry.

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